The Startling Statistics

The Employee Engagement Controversy

Recent research shows that poor management practices costs the US economy alone $350 billion every year! Can you image what the world loses!
The source of this and many more startling statistics is the US consultant Gallup Inc. who developed the EE concept as a method of measuring worldwide management efficiency.

However, other than in the world of academics and consultants it’s hardly ever mentioned. Over the next few weeks I am going to review the following key issues from a managers and supervisors point of view.

– What does employee engagement mean?
– The Gallup Q12
– Where has EE gone wrong?
– What can a manager or supervisor do about it all?

I hope that this will stipulate interest and responses from people from a broad range of managerial positions.Click for more on this

Chris Thomas

How well have we done with EE?

Well, not very well.
Since 2000 our progress in the US has improved by just a few percentage points.
For example,
Over the last 15 years our level of engaged employees has risen by just over 5 %.
Over the last five years it’s less than 2%.
Gallup have stated that the field leaders are achieving engagement levels of over 60% so it can be achieved!
We take away the management emphasis on machines, technical issues, endless meetings, scholarly reports and even the blatant pursuit of profit. We need to become real managers by building effective and sustainable relationships with the people that work for us. If you do that well then the profits will come!
Does all this sound familiar to you? Some pretty eminent mangers have been preaching this for many years long before EE.

Where has Employee Engagement gone wrong?

You would think that the startling statistics published in support of EE would have inspired world politicians and business leaders to immediately initiate strategies and even laws to facilitate EE throughout the world!
In the 15 years or so that EE has been around I was working as a senior manager with some major international companies. I cannot remember a single conversation about EE from my bosses or peer manages. No directives, no focused training, or guidelines – absolutely nothing! Do your own survey. Call ten manager colleagues and ask them what they know about EE.
I believe the EE revolution just never went top down to the grass roots where manager/supervisors have the relationships needed to address the EE opportunities.
Check out EE on the internet. You will find policy and strategy documents, white papers, consulting offers, university dissipations and o on. How can a simple concept known for years be made so complex and out of touch with reality.
I think Gallup has given a new chance to focus on the most important principles of good management and we should take it.

The Gallup Q12

In order to come to their conclusions Gallup developed a standard questionnaire consisting of twelve questions known as the Q12. The questions were chosen based on Gallup´s survey of the twelve issues that concern employees. Periodically Gallup undertakes another survey to determine progress made in improving the world standard of management effectiveness. The resulting data can be used to determine the management effectiveness of individual managers, individual organizations, industry groups, individual countries, etc. In principle, they have developed a standard set metrics to measure management performance:
Q1 – I know what is expected of me at work
Q2 – I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right
Q3 – At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day
Q4 – In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work
Q5 – My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person
Q6 – There is someone at work who encourages my development
Q7. At work, my opinions seem to count
Q8. The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important

Q9. My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work
Q10. I have a best friend at work
Q11. In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress
Q12. This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow.
To me the most interesting and significant feed back from Q12 is that with te possible exception of QX every question (i.e. employee concern) relates to having an effective manager – employee effective relationship!
So if we simplify the EE concept and the Q12 in particular , we find that the core issue is nothing new. This all about building relationships and effective motivation.
Are we just repacking existing management principles?
Well-done Gallup! You have not only focused on the key to management but also a great implementation and measurement tool.

What does engagement mean?

For illustration purposes, lets consider a manager with a group of ten employees then the employee engagement statistics means that this group will consist of three types of workers as shown below:
Three engaged employees
Five disengaged employees

Two actively disengaged employees
Of course, these are average figures base on worldwide surveys and may not apply to groups that you know.
Next weeks blog will continue with this theme and review how Gallup collects all their input data. It´s quite interesting!
. I would love to have your feedback!

Employee Engagement or EE

Recent research shows that poor management practices costs the US economy alone $350 billion every year! Can you image what the world loses!

The source of this and many more startling statistics is the US consultant Gallup Inc. who developed the EE concept as a method of measuring worldwide management efficiency.

 

However, other than in the world of academics and consultants it’s hardly ever mentioned. Over the next few weeks I am going to review the following key issues from a managers and supervisors point of view.

 

  • What does employment engagement mean?
  • The Gallup Q12
  • Where has EE gone wrong?
  • What can a manager o supervisor do about it all?

 

I hope that this will stipulate interest and responses from people from a broad range of managerial positions.

Chris Thomas

Managers Prime Responsibility

As a manager you have one prime responsibility that is more important than all others put together, which is:

 

The responsibility to build and maintain effective relationships

 with the people that report to you.

This does not mean other responsibilities are not important but they exist only to support and facilitate the prime responsibility.

 

Our mission is to inspire new and existing managers and supervisors to achieve this.

 

Over the next few weeks I am going to review the management buzz issues about Employee Engagement (EE), which is in my opinion isdirectly linked to the prime responsibility stated above.

 

Welcome to our first blog.

Chris Thomas